How to Judge Eggs

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Shape

Showing ample breath, good dome, with greater length than width, the top to be much roomier than the bottom and more curved. The bottom is more pointed in the adult egg than that of the young female, but it should not be too pointed. Turkeys, ducks and geese all lay slightly different shaped eggs and are judged individually.

Colour

The colour should be even and in the case of mottled or speckled eggs, regular mottles or speckles are preferred. Mottled or speckled eggs are shown according to their base colour.

Yolk

Rich bright golden yellow, free from streaks or spots. Well rounded, smooth on surface, and well raised from albumen. One uniform shade.

Air-space

Very small, as befits a new-laid egg, the membrane adhering to the shell.

Size

The egg size should be true to the type of bird. Eggs can vary from around 50g for fowls and bantams up to 200g for geese eggs.

Appearance

Shells to be clean, without dull or stale appearance; airspace to be small, as befits a new laid egg, contents on candling to be free of blood or meat spots. Eggs may be washed in preparation but not polished.

Albumen

The white of the egg.

Preferably translucent in colour, particularly  dense around the yolk, which it raises. Outline of albumen to be seen. Free of spots.

Freshness

Indicated by small air-space, and unwrinkled top surface of yolk, and its height. Stale yolks flop at edges.

Shell Texture

Smooth, free from lines or bulges, evenly limed, smooth at each end, without roughness, porous parts or lime pimples.

Uniformity

Eggs forming a plate or single exhibit to be uniform in shape, shell grade, shell texture size and colour.

Chalaza

Spring-like strands that hold the yolk in place to the shell.

Each chalaza to resemble a thick cord of white albumen at each end of yolk, keeping it centered.

The above judging criteria and comments have been provided for the purpose of education and do not represent the views, opinions or position of judges, officials or the RA&HS. Any resemblance to actual persons, competitors, or exhibits living or dead, or actual events is purely coincidental.

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